Does obesity need “staging?”

I’ve been reading some critiques of the EOSS, and I don’t disagree with them, but I think that for doctors, having a flow chart that helps them in interacting with patients can be helpful.

I don’t have drawing software on my computer right now, so I’m going to do this in a very klugey way.

Does the person in front of you have any health problems? —-> no —> ask if they want advice on overall healthy living (and don’t give it if they say, “no thanks.”)

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yes  —-> address health problems —> ask if they want advice on overall healthy living (and don’t give it if they say, “no thanks.”)

 

Where does weight come in?

Well, that’s part of the whole person in front of you. Just like their skin color may mean they are at higher risk of skin cancer, or if they have an outdoor job no matter what their skin color might mean they are at a higher risk of skin cancer. Or if they let you know they have a family or personal history of skin cancer. So, really, skin color alone isn’t going to be helpful in accurately assessing risk of skin cancer. You’re going to have to dig a little deeper, so to speak, and look at strangely shaped moles and assess sun habits and the like.

Fatness alone isn’t going to tell you much of anything. Weight history, well, that might be useful. How I would love it if a doctor asked me, “what is your weight history?” The doctor might listen, and then conclude, “hmmm, she seems to have figured this out for herself. I don’t want to mess with it.”

Gotta get on with my day. I hope yesterday’s post didn’t come off as too arrogant or flippant. Please let me know if something I’ve written struck you the wrong way — sometimes I’m just in a hurry to commit thoughts to pixels.

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “Does obesity need “staging?”

  1. I didn’t get any bad vibes from your post yesterday. And I totally agree with today’s. I particulary liked this line:
    The doctor might listen, and then conclude, “hmmm, she seems to have figured this out for herself. I don’t want to mess with it.”

    Oh, if this were the case more often, life would be grand!

  2. How I would love it if a doctor asked me, “what is your weight history?”

    Indeed. Sudden unintentional weight loss or gain is very often a useful symptom. One (adult patient) intake questionnaire asked “Has your weight changed over the last year? If so, was it intentional?” That, I think, is often more relevant than one’s weight per se.

  3. “Fatness alone isn’t going to tell you much of anything.”

    Amen. And well stated. 🙂 Opinion warning–> The biomedical model of health care tends to disregard or deny a key component of healing, namely health. When professional providers of so-called *health care* look at individuals, do they (we) see whole persons with complex needs–living within complex social systems, or do they (we) see diseases and/or symptoms that need to be fixed or eliminated–as if human beings are machines or problems to be solved…

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